What to Study This Week: Non vedo l’ora!

Ciao a tutti!

Continuing this week with our series of phrases from Il Commissario Manara: Un morto di troppo on Yabla, we have a phrase that actually came up last week in discussions in our group.

 

Non vedo l’ora!
I can’t wait!

 

In our episode, Luca’s sister, Teresa, has just been introduced to Lara, Luca’s love interest throughout the season. She lets it slip that Luca has mentioned Lara to her when she says:

 

Io non vedevo l’ora di conoscere la donna che è riuscita a mettere il guinzaglio…
I couldn’t wait to meet the woman that managed to put a leash…

 

Teresa uses the imperfect tense here, but we’ll get to that in a minute. First, what exactly does it mean non vedere l’ora? Translated literally it means:

 

Non vedo l’ora.
I don’t see the time.

 

How exactly does that translate to I can’t wait? Well, just like in English, this phrase is purely idiomatic. I have managed to find some interesting ideas among the community at WordReference for why this modo di dire has developed.

 

I like dragonseven’s idea:

Penso sia una metafora che indica la morbosa impazienza dell’evento scandita del fatto che il tempo della venuta si allunga/allontana percettibilmente sempre più verso l’infinito e di conseguenza non se ne vede più l’arrivo.

I think it’s a metaphor indicating the morbid impatience for the event marked by the fact that the time of its arrival elongates perceptibly towards the infinite and consequently you can’t see its arrival anymore.

 

Very poetic! But Anaiss really makes the point we need to focus on:

 

…è un’espressione talmente consolidata che non faccio nemmeno più caso al significato letterale.  

It’s an expression so ingrained that I don’t even notice the literal meaning.

 

And that’s what we have to learn to do, too. It’s just like the many idiomatic phrases we use in English and take so for granted that we don’t even question them anymore.*

It is useful to know what you are saying in a sense because unlike the English version, non vedo l’ora will generally be followed up with di (qualcosa) which won’t make sense if you’re translating as I can’t wait.

 

Non vedo l’ora di vederti!
I can’t wait to see you!

 

Or more literally:

 

I don’t see the time of seeing you!

 

So, now it makes more sense when we see Teresa’s remark in the imperfect tense.

 

Non vedevo l’ora di conoscere la donna…
I wasn’t seeing the time of knowing the woman…

 

Here are some examples of this phrase in action from Reverso:

 

La gente non vede l’ora di spettegolare sulle disgrazie.
People can’t wait to gossip about misfortunes.

 

E non vede l’ora di incontrarti.
And s/he can’t wait to meet you.

 

Scommetto che non vedi l’ora che muoia per tenerti tutto!
I bet you can’t wait for me to die so you can get everything!

 

E non vedono l’ora di sguazzare nel fango.
And they can’t wait to play in the mud.

 

Non è giusto, non vedevo l’ora di stare con te.
That’s not true, I couldn’t wait to be with you.

 

Ieri sera non vedevi l’ora di lasciare tutto questo.
Yesterday evening you couldn’t wait to leave all this.

 

But what if you want to say you can’t wait until something? In that case, you need to use che, and this gets a little bit more complicated because it requires the subjunctive or the Italian congiuntivo. This really isn’t as hard as it sounds. Say enough phrases out loud often enough and you will come to expect the sound of the congiuntivo. You will find yourself getting it right without knowing how you managed it.

 

Non vedo l’ora che sia venerdì.
I can’t wait until (it is) Friday.

 

Ma non vedo l’ora che arrivi quel giorno.
I can’t wait until that day arrives.

 

But if you’re just beginning your study of Italian, don’t sweat it. For now, just say:

 

Non vedo l’ora!

 

E io non vedo l’ora che arrivi la prossima lezione!

 

Wait… what language is THAT?

Yabla Italian is an excellent tool to help you develop an ear for spoken Italian. (I use Yabla personally to study three different languages.) With Yabla Italian you will have:

  • verbatim subtitles in Italian
  • access to English subtitles when you need them
  • the ability to turn the subtitles off as you improve
  • quizzes to gauge how well you’re doing

And… this is especially useful… you can slow the video down! Yes! We all know how fast the Italians talk. You know a lot of the words. If you just had a little more time to process them…. Well, now you do!

If you feel your Italian is good enough to watch without Italian (or English) subtitles, this episode of Il Commissario Manara is also available for free from RAI. You will need to fast forward to exactly 48 minutes for the start of Un morto di troppo.
 

 

*Need some examples? Here you go: When you pull your car into the driveway, what exactly are you pulling? (maybe once it was a team of horses?) Take a nap? Take an exam? Where are you taking it? Pay attention? Who do you pay? (In Italian you lend it!) Very soon to dial the telephone will sound very strange to people. If you start to notice it, English is just full of examples like this. And we don’t even notice them!

Canzone: Caruso

Canzone: Caruso
di Lucio Dalla
Difficoltà: avanzato
Tempi: presente, passato remoto, trapassato prossimo, imperfetto, Neapolitan dialect

Buy this song: On Amazon

Download the Study Sheet

Qui dove il mare luccica e tira forte il vento
su una vecchia terrazza davanti al golfo di Surriento
un uomo abbraccia una ragazza dopo che aveva pianto
poi si schiarisce la voce e ricomincia il canto

Te voglio bene assaje
ma tanto, tanto bene sai
è una catena ormai
che scioglie il sangue dint’e vene sai

Vide le luci in mezzo al mare
pensò alle notti là in America
ma erano solo le lampare e
la bianca scia di un’elica

Sentì il dolore nella musica, si alzò dal pianoforte
ma quando vide la luna uscire da una nuvola
gli sembrò più dolce anche la morte

Guardò negli occhi la ragazza,
quegli occhi verdi come il mare
poi all’improvviso uscì una lacrima
e lui credette di affogare

Te voglio bene assaje
ma tanto tanto bene sai
è una catena ormai
che scioglie il sangue dint’e vene sai

Potenza della lirica dove ogni dramma è un falso
che con un po’ di trucco e
con la mimica puoi diventare un altro
ma due occhi che ti guardano, così vicini e veri
ti fan scordare le parole, confondono i pensieri

Così diventa tutto piccolo, anche le notti là in America
ti volti e vedi la tua vita come la scia di un’elica

Ma sì, è la vita che finisce ma lui non ci pensò poi tanto
anzi si sentiva già felice e ricominciò il suo canto

Te voglio bene assaje ma tanto tanto bene sai
è una catena ormai che scioglie il sangue dint’e vene sai
Te voglio bene assaje ma tanto tanto bene sai
è una catena ormai che scioglie il sangue dint’e vene sai


Grazie a Annamarie!

What to Study This Week: Ho sentito tanto parlare di te

Ciao a tutti!

We’re continuing this week with our series of phrases from Il Commissario Manara: Un morto di troppo on Yabla.

Luca’s sister has come to visit him (è venuta a trovare) and now Lara, Luca’s on-again off-again girlfriend and fellow detective has just appeared. When Teresa hears who she is she says:

 

Ma sai che ho sentito tanto parlare di te!
But you know I have heard so much about you!

More literally this might be:

Ho sentito tanto parlare di te!
I’ve heard so much talk of you!

And if you want to use the formal you:

Ho sentito tanto parlare di Lei!
I’ve heard so much about you!

 

You can also say:

…di loro
…di lui
…di voi
…del NJILE

 

The tricky part comes when you want to drop …di (qualcuno/qualcosa). Here you need to use the infamous ne.

I’m not going to go too deeply into this. I think it’s best just to learn via phrase. However, for those of you struggling to understand the difference between ne and ci, here is a tiny bit of grammar.

Whenever you use the preposition di, you will replace it with ne.
Everything else, mainly a, but also su and in, will be replaced with ci.

So…

 

Ne ho sentito tanto parlare.
I’ve heard a lot of talk about it.

 

or what if I haven’t?

 

Non ne ho mai sentito parlare.
I have never heard of it.

 

Now for those of you who are more advanced, what about this? Suppose you heard someone else talking about something?

 

I heard him talking about it.
L‘ho sentito mentre ne parlava.

 

or more literally:

 

L‘ho sentito mentre ne parlava.
I heard him while he was talking about it.

 

 

Here are some examples from Reverso:

Sa, ho sentito parlare di persone come lei.
You know, I’ve heard of people like you.

Davvero non ne hai mai sentito parlare?
You have really never heard of it?

Probabilmente non ne hai mai sentito parlare.
You have probably never heard of it.

E ho sentito parlare di tutti.
And I’ve heard of everybody.

E poi… ho sentito parlare del Dragone.
And then… I heard about the Dragon.

Stavo giusto dicendo che ho sentito parlare di cibo quadrato.
I was just saying that I’ve heard of a square meal.

Come mai non ne ho sentito parlare dall’altro chirurgo?
How come I’ve never heard of the other surgeon?

Appena ho sentito parlare di quella scialuppa carbonizzata, ho voluto vederla.
As soon as I heard about that charred lifeboat, I wanted to see it.

Del reattore in Cina ne ho sentito parlare, ma dell’aumento dei futures della soia…
The reactor in China, I heard about, but the spike in soy futures…

La sorella di Dave ha sentito lui mentre ne parlava.
Dave’s sister heard him while he was talking about it.

 

How do you search for examples on Reverso?

You can see my search terms in the above sentences in blue. When you are unsure about how to say something, give it a try. Put your attempt in the search bar and see if you get any exact hits. One hit doesn’t tell you much, but if you get a lot of them, you’re on to something. But don’t stop there. Read the sentences to be sure that what you think you’re saying is actually what you’re saying!

You can also try putting the English phrase into the search bar and see what comes back. You may have to try a few times before you get a phrase that works. If you find Reverso keeps changing your text to something else, it could mean that your attempt is completely wrong, but it doesn’t necessarily mean that. Try adding or removing words from the phrase. Read the sentences and you will get the gist!

How will you use today’s phrase to express YOUR OWN THOUGHTS? The sooner you express your own thoughts, the sooner you will remember the phrase, so give it a try. Have you just been introduced to your daughter’s new boyfriend? Or a new colleague at work?

 

Ho sentito tanto parlare di Lei!

 

Or is a friend of yours talking about a new film?

 

Sì, ho sentito parlare di questo film.

 

Let us know how you used this phrase on Facebook.

That’s it for this week!

Alla prossima!

 

Yabla Italian is an excellent tool to help you develop an ear for spoken Italian. (I use Yabla personally to study three different languages.) With Yabla Italian you will have:

  • verbatim subtitles in Italian
  • access to English subtitles when you need them
  • the ability to turn the subtitles off as you improve
  • quizzes to gauge how well you’re doing

And… this is especially useful… you can slow the video down! Yes! We all know how fast the Italians talk. You know a lot of the words. If you just had a little more time to process them…. Well, now you do!

If you feel your Italian is good enough to watch without Italian (or English) subtitles, this episode of Il Commissario Manara is also available for free from RAI. You will need to fast forward to exactly 48 minutes for the start of Un morto di troppo.

Canzone: Lei è

Canzone: Lei è
di Paolo Meneguzzi
Difficoltà: avanzato
Tempi: presente, congiuntivo trapassato, condizionale presente; futuro

Buy this song: On Amazon

Download the Study Sheet

passa il tempo e la ritrovo qui
come se non fosse andata mai via
mentre fruga tra gli armadi miei
mette quel maglione enorme che so già
camminare intorno dove è lei
fare finta che non sono qui per lei
ma è difficile convincersi che
non è con me… lei… lei è

il sole dentro me
l’amore che non c’è
il sogno che vorrei
la vita che farei… lei è

la luna dentro me
la pace che non c’è
la forza che vorrei… lei è

lei è il tempo che non passa mai
lei è l’ombra dentro i passi miei… lei è
lei è luce in una lacrima
lei è fibra dentro l’anima… lei è

lei è l’acqua della verità
lei è storia che non morirà mai
lei è musica nella follia
lei è poesia…lei… lei è

il sole dentro
l’amore che non c’è
il sogno che vorrei
la vita che farei… lei è

la luna dentro me
la pace che non c’è
la forza che vorrei… lei è

lei è il tempo che non passa mai
lei è l’ombra dentro i passi miei
lei è luce in una lacrima
lei è fibra dentro l’anima

lei è l’acqua della verità
lei è storia che non morirà mai
ma è difficile convincersi che
non è con me… lei…… lei è

il sole dentro me
l’amore che non c’è
il sogno che vorrei
la vita che farei… lei è

la luna dentro me
la pace che non c’è
la forza che vorrei… lei è

il sole dentro me
l’amore che non c’è
il sogno che vorrei
la vita che farei… lei è:

la luna dentro me
la pace che non c’è
la forza che vorrei… lei è!
lei è il tempo che non passa mai
lei è l’ombra dentro i passi miei


Grazie a Annamarie!

What to Study This Week: Venire a trovare

Ciao a tutti!

Those of you who have studied with Pimsleur will recognize this week’s phrase as we continue to study our episode of Il Commissario Manara as it appears on Yabla. In fact, this phrase appears relatively early in the Pimsleur lessons. Here it is:

 

venire a trovare (or andare a trovare)
to come to visit (to go to visit)

 

or more literally:

 

venire a trovare
to come to find

 

Last week Luca was surprised by Teresa, who has come to visit him. He says:

 

Teresa, ma che ci fai qua? Ma che sei pazza?
Teresa, but what are you doing here? But what are you crazy?

 

to which Teresa replies:

 

Allora, mi sono fatta dodici ore di treno per venirti a trovare e questa è l’accoglienza?
So, I did twelve hours on the train to come to visit you and this is the welcome?

 

So, what about this phrase is going to give you trouble? Well, the pronoun of course! When there are two infinitives like this, is it:

 

venirti a trovare

or

venire a trovarti?

 

Well, it depends on who you talk to! Both are used in spoken language, and are more or less common depending on the region of Italy you are visiting. My advice is to pick one and just stick with it. The native Italians I’ve spoken to tend to prefer venire a trovarti, with the pronoun attached to the last infinitive. It sounds better to their ears. So, I’ve personally chosen to stick with that.

 

You will also sometimes hear the pronoun placed in front of both verbs, like this:

 

La famiglia ti viene a trovare.
The family is coming to visit you.

 

Don’t worry about learning every different way of saying it. Pick one. Just be aware of the others so that when you hear them, you’ll understand.

 

Here are some more examples in context:

 

Vedi che bravo figlio, che viene a trovare la mamma.
Look what a good son, that comes to visit his mother.

Tua madre viene a trovarti domani?
Is your mother coming to visit you tomorrow?

Ti spiace se vengo a trovarti?
Do you mind if I visit you?

Ecco perché nessuno viene a trovarla.
That’s why nobody comes to visit her/you (formal)

Lei è l’unica che viene a trovarlo.
She is the only one that comes to visit him.

Non vieni mai a trovarci.
You never come to visit us.

 

Of course, you are not limited to coming to visit, you can also go to visit.

 

E a volte mi rendo conto che le persone mi stanno pensando, per cui vado a trovarle.
And sometimes I realize that people are thinking of me, so I go visit them.

Sono solo andata a trovarlo all’ospedale poche volte.
I only went to visit him in the hospital a few times.

 

Now, to learn, you really need to express your own thoughts. I can’t stress this enough. Once you have used a phrase to express your own thoughts a few times it becomes much easier to remember. So, how can you take what you’ve learned here and express your own thoughts?

 

Do you have a trip planned? Who are you visiting? How would you tell this to a friend? How could you greet your friend when you got there? Or maybe you’re visiting someone in the hospital? Or you want to see a friend that you haven’t seen in a while? How do you tell them you’re coming?

 

Let us know on Facebook how you used this phrase in context!

 

Yabla Italian is an excellent tool to help you develop an ear for spoken Italian. (I use Yabla personally to study three different languages.) With Yabla Italian you will have:

  • verbatim subtitles in Italian
  • access to English subtitles when you need them
  • the ability to turn the subtitles off as you improve
  • quizzes to gauge how well you’re doing

And… this is especially useful… you can slow the video down! Yes! We all know how fast the Italians talk. You know a lot of the words. If you just had a little more time to process them…. Well, now you do!

If you feel your Italian is good enough to watch without Italian (or English) subtitles, this episode of Il Commissario Manara is also available for free from RAI. You will need to fast forward to exactly 48 minutes for the start of Un morto di troppo.